An Arguement of Locke’s Ideas are the Foundation for Perceptual Knowledge

An Arguement of Locke’s Ideas are the Foundation for Perceptual Knowledge

Document details
Category: Philosophy Essay
Subcategory: Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Words: 1018
Pages: 2

It is said that one learns something new each day. At a young age one learns the basics of mathematics, speaking, writing etc. Nevertheless, how does one learn what a tree is, what it looks like, the color, smell, shape? One might learn that a tree is part of the Spermatophyte division, or that I its leaves are green and contain chlorophyll and even that paper can be made from it, but how does one know? One can touch the bark, see the leaves in the wind and even read about other's experiences with trees, therefore leaving knowledge that it is a tree. However, John Locke has much to add to this notion. Although it may be evident that the perceptual knowledge of external objects can be gained by the senses, John Locke argues that ones ideas are actually the objects of perception. John Locke thinks that we get knowledge of physical bodies by ideas. He classifies ideas into two basic types simple and complex. Complex ideas are built from simple ideas. All knowledge, therefore, traces back to simple ideas, and simple ideas come exclusively through experience. Furthermore, Locke claims that we can break all of our experiences down into their fundamental parts. If we see a cat, for instance, we can break that sensation down into blackness, softness, shininess, a certain size, a certain shape, etc. Fundamental bits, those that are "uncompounded, without parts," and cannot be broken down any further, are simple ideas. Moreover, there are only two ways that a simple idea can find its way into a human mind through sensation, or by reflection. In sensation the mind turns outward to the world and receives ideas through the faculties of sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste. In reflection the mind turns toward its own operations, receiving such as ideas as thinking, willing, believing, doubting. Why does this matter in gaining knowledge of physical bodies? According to Locke, the idea is actually...

“A good sample is better than the advice"
Hire EliteEssayWriters to Write Your Assignment!
similar examples
Three Philosophers, Three Major Issues: Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau on the State of Nature, the Social Contract and Ideal Governments
Category: Philosophy
1882 words
3 pages
HOBBES, LOCKE AND ROUSSEAU THE STATE OF NATURE Hobbes invites us to take place in a thought experiment where equals and nonequals are placed together in a state of nature without the existence of a state power placed over them. Hobbes believes that the people will soon lapse into a ...
The Ideas of John Locke about the Responsibilities of Government
Category: Philosophy
3843 words
6 pages
I hold it, that a little rebellion, now and then, is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical. - Thomas JeffersonPolitical rebellion takes place when the people of a country feel it is essential that a change in government is made. Different ...
A Look at John Locke’s Ideas About Philosophy
Category: Philosophy
272 words
1 pages
John Locke And Politics John Locke and his ideas about philosophy was a major influence on the Americanpolitical system, not to mention many other political systems, too. His ideaswere very universal, especially those regarding rights and freedom, two topicsfor which the United States of America is best known. Locke claimed ...
The Enlightenment: John Locke and the Ideas of Philosophies
Category: Philosophy
938 words
2 pages
The Enlightenment was an 18th century intellectual movement concentrated in France that had lasting repercussions throughout Europe and America. Questioning traditional doctrines and values marked the Enlightenment there was a notable tendency towards individualism and emphasis on the ideas of human progress. Celebrated philosophes such as Francois-Marie Arouet also known ...
Development of Society between the Years of 1500 and 1789 and the Ideas of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Category: Philosophy
1551 words
2 pages
Early Human Society Between the years of 1500 and 1789, was a period of growing societies, government, culture, and the values of human beings. Many great English philosophers during this time such as John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Thomas Hobbes wrote and collected their ideas that depict the nature of ...
A Comparison of the Ideas in the Social Contract by Rousseau and Second Treatise of Government by Locke
Category: Philosophy
1021 words
2 pages
The state of nature, as described by Locke, is a state of perfect freedom, a state in which man is completely free, but would Rousseau agree with this? The answer to this question is more complex than it seems. Locke and Rousseau, both great philosophers of their time, have similar ...
GET EVEN A BETTER ESSAY!
It's a lifetime discount time!
15% off
Save this discount code:
15OFFJUST4U